Military combat simulator developer urges people not to use game to create fake Ukraine war footage

Editor’s note: The war in Ukraine is a permanent, painful and moving subject. IGN urges community members to be respectful when engaging in conversation on this topic and does not condone any form of harassment.

Eagle Dynamics, the developer of military combat simulator DCS World, asked people not to present the gameplay as images of the ongoing war in Ukraine.

Last week, we reported that images from video games were misrepresented as images from Ukraine. One of the games involved was DCS World, a highly realistic, free-to-play military combat simulator, which replicates (among other things) real-life fighter jets and regions of the world, including parts of Russia and Crimea.

In one notable example, images from DCS: World was spreading on social media claiming to show a Ukrainian fighter pilot shooting down a Russian plane, before fans of the game noted the truth behind the clip. Twitter has since added background information to posts that include the clip.

Clips such as the ones above have now caused DCS World developer Eagle Dynamics to issue a statement about the DCS Global Discord and Eagle Dynamics Twitter accountacknowledging the harm caused by misinformation and pleading with readers “to be reasonable and avoid using DCS to create videos of this nature”.

The developer also thanked fans for reporting misinformation involving DCS World, saying, “Fake news of this nature is too serious to be left alone and should be reported by those of you who know what to look for.”

You can read the full statement below:

Alongside Eagle Dynamics, Arma 3 developer Bohemia Interactive also acknowledged that footage from its military game was used for misinformation and said it was helping media verify the videos:

The invasion of Ukraine has prompted many pleas for support and help from the gaming industry, both inside and outside Ukraine itself.

A number of humanitarian aid organizations are currently accepting donations and support for their efforts to help war-affected Ukrainians. They understand:

  • save the children: On the ground at the moment to provide humanitarian aid to children.
  • UNICEF: Provide emergency supplies and clean water to communities, as well as care for children on the ground who have been separated from their families.
  • HOPE project: Sending medical supplies and providing health care to refugees.

Joe Skrebels is IGN’s news editor. Follow him on Twitter. Any advice to give us? Want to discuss a possible story? Please send an e-mail to [email protected].

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